TV Logo


Stunts Pic

Episode #7

Stunts and Stage Combat

They fall from airplanes, on fire, without a parachute, and land in the ocean with scuba gear, swim to shore and duel it out with the evil intruders. Who are these courageous or crazed people? They are stunt men and women and stage combat experts who make our film experiences entrancing and enthralling. How does someone decide to become a stunt person? Are there schools to train you for stage combat and swordplay? This episode of Starstyle® The Business of Showbusiness is all about the people behind the actors and how their type of acting take true skill and guts.

Lisa Cohen stumbled literally into stunt work as a result of not getting a principal part in a film and being asked to be a stunt double instead. She’s from Brooklyn, New york, studied musical theatre and is an underwater stunt specialist, having been a stunt double in Sphere and working in several TV shows and feature films as a stuntwoman, including The Bachelor, What Dreams May Come, VIP, Nash Bridges and True Crime, to name a few.

Larry Henderson and Lisa Cohen
Larry Henderson and Lisa Cohen

Larry Henderson is the resident fight director for the San Francisco Opera. He has been choreographing live action scene work for 24 years. Larry holds a degree in dance and dramatic art from the University of California, Berkeley. He has trained as a competitive fencer, professional actor and dancer, and is a certified teacher with the Society of American Fight Directors.

Larry has had the opportunity to work with such companies as the American Conservatory Theatre, Berkeley Repertory, the Smithsonian Museum, The Metropolitan Opera, and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, among others.

In 1995, Larry was selected to represent American teachers of Stage Combat at the first International Stage Combat Workshop in London, England.

He has choreographed nearly 300 productions.


Home | Order Video

For information, contact cynthia@star-style.com
©1999 Starstyle Productions, LLC, All Rights Reserved
Last Updated March 16, 1999